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Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument

Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument features some of the most scenic and biologically diverse landscapes in northern California. These lands range from rolling, oak-studded hillsides to steep creek canyons and ridgelines with expansive views.

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California Coastal National Monument

California Coastal National Monument protects fragile coastal resources with more than 20,000 rocks, islands, exposed reefs, and pinnacles along the California coastline, and 1,665 acres of public land onshore in the Point Arena-Stornetta Unit.

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California Desert Conservation Lands

Made up of five distinct regions including the Amargosa Basin, Silurian Valley, Panamint Valley, Chuckwalla Bench and Yuha Desert, the California Desert Conservation Lands are a place for endless exploration on hiking and driving trails–more than one could fit in a lifetime. These lands also protect critical wildlife habitat and species: more new species are being discovered within the California Desert Conservation Lands than in the entire rest of the state.

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Carrizo Plain National Monument

Three hundred years ago, California's Central Valley was a vast grassland where antelope and elk grazed and wildflowers swept the spring landscape. Today, amid urban and agriculture development, a truly amazing remnant of that landscape remains in the Carrizo Plain National Monument.

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Fort Ord National Monument

Explore more than 86 miles of trails as you to hike, bike or ride your horse through rolling hills, and pockets of chaparral and oak woodlands at the Fort Ord National Monument.

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Headwaters Forest Reserve

The 7,472-acre Headwaters Forest Reserve was established in 1999 after a decade-long grassroots effort to protect the world’s last unprotected, intact, old-growth redwood forest ecosystem. Several threatened species call the Reserve home, including coho salmon, the northern spotted owl, and the marbled murrelet.

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King Range National Conservation Area

The King Range National Conservation Area encompasses 68,000 acres along 35 miles of California's dramatic north coast. This remote region of mountains and seascapes is known as California's Lost Coast.

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Mojave Trails National Monument

Spanning 1.6 million acres, including more than 350,000 acres of congressionally-designated Wilderness, the Mojave Trails National Monument is comprised of a stunning mosaic of rugged mountain ranges, ancient lava flows, and spectacular sand dunes.

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Piedras Blancas Outstanding Natural Area

The Piedras Blancas Light Station is a historic landmark on California's central coast. The Light Station is named for the distinctive white rocks that loom just offshore.

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Sand To Snow National Monument

One of California’s and the nation’s most diverse landscapes, Sand to Snow National Monument rises from the desert up to southern California’s tallest alpine peak, Mount San Gorgonio. The region is sacred to Serrano, Cahuilla and Luiseño Indian people. Visitors enjoy camping, hiking, backpacking on the Pacific Crest Trail, climbing, horse packing, bird watching, hunting, fishing, stargazing, mountain biking and extraordinary opportunities for solitude.

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Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument

Rising abruptly from the desert floor to 10,834 feet, the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument contains magnificent palm oases, snow-capped mountains, a national scenic trail, and wilderness areas.